Welcome!

So happy that you clicked and landed here!  

My name is Marcia Chambers and I am a Speaker and Sexual Wellness Consultant for Women.

I help married women who are lonely in their relationships to get back to S.L.U.T.T.Y. – more Sex, more Love, more Understanding and more Tenderness To You, through an 8-week online experience called “Bring Back that Lovin’ Feeling.” The 8 week experience clears the cobwebs, so that they can FEEL CONNECTION, FEEL APPRECIATION and give themselves permission to be sensual while they Unleash their Inner Sexual Goddesses.  That’s  one element of S.W.E.L.L. for Women – Sexual Wellness & Empowered Living Lifestyles for Women.

S.W.E.L.L. for Women ~ Sexual Wellness & Empowered Lifestyle Living for Women is an info-tainment forum where women feel safe because they belong to a community of women whom they have learned to trust.  It is a platform for women to learn about their sexuality, they expand their sexual vocabulary and they empower their sexual wellness by uncovering the healthful and pleasurable benefits of adult toys.

I love helping women be confident in their sexuality.  I love helping women to attain higher self-esteem so that they can stand tall with our without high heels!  

In S.W.E.L.L. (Sexual Wellness & Empowered Lifestyle Living) for Women we build communities through caring and sharing at live retreats and virtual workshops.  We learn to be comfortable when speaking about sex and not have to whisper.  We no longer have limiting beliefs about sex being dirty.

S.W.E.L.L. for Women is focused on creating memorable, informative and pleasurable moments for you!

 

S.W.E.L.L for Women - Woman of the Month

ALICE WALKER ~ FEBRUARY 9, 1944 - PRESENT

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Background

Alice Malsenior Walker was born on February 9, 1944, in Eatonton, Georgia. The youngest daughter of sharecroppers, she grew up poor. Her mother worked as a maid to help support the family's eight children. When Walker was 8 years old, she suffered a serious injury: She was shot in the right eye with a BB pellet while playing with two of her brothers. Whitish scar tissue formed in her damaged eye, and she became self-conscious of this visible mark.

After high school, Walker attended Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia and graduated in 1965 from Sarah Lawrence College in Yonkers (Bronxville postal zone), New York. During her junior year, she spent a summer as an exchange student in Uganda.

She was married to activist Mel Leventhal from 1967 to 1976; the couple had one daughter, Rebecca Walker (also a prominent activist and writer).

HER LEADERSHIP

After college, Walker worked as a social worker, teacher and lecturer. She became active in the Civil Rights Movement, fighting for equality for all African Americans. Her experiences informed her first collection of poetry, Once, which was published in 1968. 

Walker's career as a writer took flight with the publication of her third novel, The Color Purple, in 1982. Set in the early 1900s, the novel explores the female African-American experience through the life and struggles of its narrator, Celie. Celie suffers terrible abuse at the hands of her father, and later, from her husband. The compelling work won Walker both the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction in 1983ers.

Sexuality and Sensuality of ALICE WALKER 

Alice Walker is an African-American novelist, short story writer, poet, and activist. She wrote the critically acclaimed novel The Color Purple for which she won the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

Her writings also focus on the role of women of color in culture and history. Walker is a respected figure in the liberal political community for her support of unconventional and unpopular views as a matter of principle. She is an open bisexual, and sympathetic of people of all sexualities, ethnicities, and races.

Walker feminism specifically included advocacy of women of color. Walker coined the term "womanism" to mean "Black feminism". The term was made to unite colored feminists under one term. She said, "Womanism" gives us a word of our own.”

 
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